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  • Circumcision: Information for Parents

    Parents have different opinions about newborn circumcision based on medical, religious, cultural, and ethnic traditions, and personal reasons. Some parents choose circumcision. Some parents do not choose circumcision. Parents who are undecided should talk with their child's doctor before their child

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  • Chickenpox Vaccine, The: What You Need to Know (VIS)

    Chickenpox (also called varicella) is a common childhood disease. It is usually mild, but it can be serious, especially in young infants and adults.

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  • Dangers of Secondhand Smoke

    Even if you don’t smoke, breathing in someone else’s smoke can be deadly too. Secondhand smoke causes about 3,000 deaths from lung cancer and tens of thousands of deaths from heart disease to nonsmoking adults in the United States each year.

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  • Deciding to Wait

    No matter what you've heard, read, or seen, not everyone your age is having sex, including oral sex and intercourse. In fact, more than half of all teens choose to wait until they're older to have sex. If you have already had sex but are unsure if you should again, then wait before having sex again.

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  • Choosing Over-the-Counter Medicines for Your Child

    “Over-the-counter” (OTC) means you can buy the medicine without a doctor's prescription. Talk with your child's doctor or pharmacist* before giving your child any medicine, especially the first time.

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  • Croup: When Your Child Needs Hospital Care

    Croup is a common illness that affects the airways, making it hard for a child to breathe. It's most common in toddlers but can affect children between 6 months and 12 years of age. Another symptom is a loud barking cough that is worse at night. Trouble breathing and the barking cough can be scary for

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  • Croup and Your Young Child

    Croup is a common illness in young children. It can be scary for parents as well as children. Read on for more information from the American Academy of Pediatrics about croup, including types, causes, symptoms, and treatments.

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  • DTaP (Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis Vaccines): What You Need to Know (VIS)

    Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis are serious diseases caused by bacteria. Diphtheria and pertussis are spread from person to person. Tetanus enters the body through cuts or wounds.

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  • Ear Infections

    Ear infections (in-FEK-shuns) in children are common. Most kids get at least one ear infection by the time they are 3 years old. Most ear infections clear up without any lasting problems. Your child's doctor may also call an ear infection otitis (oh-TYE-tis) media.

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  • Colds

    Most children get 8 to 10 colds before they are 2 years old. Most colds come and go without any big problems.

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  • Decorative Contact Lenses: What Teens and Parents Need to Know

    You may want to look like your favorite movie star or singer or have the perfect look for Halloween, but changing the look of your eyes with decorative contact lenses could cause a lot of damage to your eyesight.

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  • Crying and Your Baby: How to Calm a Fussy or Colicky Baby

    Babies cry for different reasons. Crying is one way babies try to tell us what they need. They may be hungry, have a soiled diaper, or just want a little attention. (See checklist at the bottom.) If a crying baby cannot be comforted, the cause may be colic. Read on about colic and ways to calm a crying

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  • Diaper Rash

    Most babies get diaper rash, but it is usually not serious. Read on to find out more about what causes diaper rash and how to treat it.

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  • Diarrhea and Your Child

    Diarrhea is the passage of watery stools.

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  • Diarrhea, Vomiting, and Water Loss (Dehydration)

    Diarrhea (loose poop) and vomiting, or “throwing up,” are why many parents call the doctor. Your child's doctor may call this gastroenteritis (GAS- troh-en-tur-EYE-tis). These symptoms are often caused by a virus*.

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  • Eczema (Atopic Dermatitis)

    Eczema is a chronic skin problem that causes dry, red, itchy skin. It is also called atopic dermatitis or AD. Anyone can get eczema, but it is most common in babies to young adults.

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